Tap water trouble? Coming up dry on your internet search?

We discovered there's not enough trustworthy help online for common water issues, so we made Tips for Taps, the dependable guide for keeping your water healthy.


Buying a home water treatment system gives you more control over your own quality, but knowing the difference between point-of-entry (POE) or point-of-entry (POU) can help you find the best filter options.

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Suffering from dry, brittle, or even green tinted hair? While water is often treated to a baseline standard for human consumption, there is still a lot of variability in water chemistry. Variations in that chemistry may be wreaking havoc on your locks. Read on to learn how your water quality may be affecting your hair.

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Toxic Substances Control Act requires the EPA to keep a list of all chemicals made or processed in the US. To date, there are over 86,000 chemicals in this inventory. However, loopholes in the laws for testing these chemicals have allowed thousands of potentially harmful products to enter the environment. Find out why in this newest Tips for Taps article.

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White, cloudy water coming out of the tap? There are a few causes of cloudy water. Some are harmless, but others can pose health threats if not treated. We’ve broken down some of the major signs, causes and solutions to cloudy water.

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While arsenic is regulated in water systems, the EPA maximum contaminant level is actually higher than concentrations suspected to be harmful to health. If you want to remove arsenic from your tap water, there are a few important things you need to know. We’ve broken it down into a simple FAQ sheet.

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By 2030, it's estimated that ~60% of the world’s population will live in cities with 1 million or more inhabitants. It's time to consider how urbanization will affect the quality of drinking water. Read on to learn how urban development impacts the natural water cycle, changes water quality and its availability.

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One of the many proposed changes to the EPA's updated Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) is aimed at creating better practices around lead testing and treatment. Although these drinking water regulations have existed since 1991, this is the first time a federal law would specifically require utilities to test the safety of schools they service. Read more to find out what this could mean for your children's schools.

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