Tap water trouble? Coming up dry on your internet search?

We discovered there's not enough trustworthy help online for common water issues, so we made Tips for Taps, the dependable guide for keeping your water healthy.


New York Times’ Wirecutter named Tap Score testing the “best water quality test kit for your home” in 2020. Tap Score not only offers accurate results for over 1000+ contaminants, but also includes easy-to-understand reports, explanations of potential health risks, unbiased treatment recommendations, and unparalleled support.

Read more...

Water contaminants are measured using a variety of units depending on what fits best. From PPM to CFU/mL to pCi/L–we know it can be confusing. Read on to learn how to interpret units for measuring chemical, biological, radiological, and other contaminants that you may encounter on a water quality report.

Read more...

Have you ever walked into your home and been greeted by an utterly unpleasant smell coming from one of your drains? While stinky drains are certainly unwanted, the good news is that the majority of the time they are entirely non-toxic. Read on to learn about the low-cost and highly effective ways to treat smelly drains.

Read more...

As the seasons change so should your well maintenance routine. Different weather patterns affect water quality in a variety of ways. Testing your water during certain times of the year can also provide greater insight into your water quality. Follow this well maintenance schedule to help keep your water safe.

Read more...

In this second part of a two part series on the differences between various oxidative states of arsenic in water, we take a closer look at arsenic III. Read on to learn what is arsenic III, how to test for it,  and  how to remove it from your drinking water.

Read more...

Your water's appearance, smell, and taste are often important clues to finding potential hazards. In this piece, we’ll go over sense-based signs that can help guide you to the source of the problem.

Read more...

In this piece we zero in on two common forms of inorganic arsenic: arsenic III and arsenic V. While these two forms of arsenic do have some things in common, they have some very important differences when it comes to treatment and removal from tap water. Read on to learn more.

Read more...